Tag Archives: video

In Race to Win Social Video, Is One App Gaming the System Too Much? – Mike Isaac – Social – AllThingsD

Enter Viddy and Socialcam, two of the hottest start-up apps, both of which have the buzz of being the “Instagram for video.” The pair have exploded in popularity over the past few months, with each garnering user bases in the tens of millions seemingly overnight.

But the growth of one of these apps is not like the other.

Using a combination of fortunate timing, Facebook’s Open Graph influence and a new way of playing the system, Socialcam has effectively gamed Facebook, YouTube and the App Store to keep a strong grip on that ever-so-valuable user base. In the short term, at least, the three-man Socialcam start-up team has discovered a method to beat the 20-plus person outfit that is Viddy.

The method is so effective that Socialcam skyrocketed from around 1.4 million monthly active Facebook users to a whopping 40 million in a span of little more than two weeks. Socialcam surpassed Viddy in the Facebook app rankings last week, and currently sits fat atop Apple’s powerful App Store as one of the most downloaded free applications.

via allthingsd.com

Fascinating take-down of a truly unscrupulous practice employed by new “Instagram-of-Video” upstart SocialCam, an app you’ve likely seen clogging up your Facebook news feed recently.

Mike Isaac of AllThingsD dives into the story, shownig some surprisingly cutthroat tactics at play in the social sharing app space, empowered by Facebook’s black-box dominion over the news feed.

Tesco Homeplus Virtual Subway Store in South Korea – YouTube

This idea is simply genius. But what happens when some clever hoodlum covers up the milk QR code with a QR code linking you to his malware-ridden porn-serving wordpress blog? Or, even less intrusive but possibly more damaging, swaps it out for very expensive items, causing customers to scan the wrong items? Or even — pregnency tests?

BitTorrent and Netflix Dominate America’s Internet Traffic via @TorrentFreak

New data published by the Canadian broadband management company Sandvine reveals that on the average day Netflix and BitTorrent are responsible for 40 percent of all Internet traffic in North America. During peak hours Netflix accounts for a third of all download traffic, while BitTorrent is credited for nearly half of all upload traffic during the busiest time of the day.
Netflix is by far the most bandwidth-consuming source of traffic. On an average day, 23.3% of all North American traffic comes from or goes to Netflix. BitTorrent is a good second with 16.5% of the traffic pie, meaning that Netflix and BitTorrent together account for almost 40% of all traffic.

The most surprising – yet obvious – aspect of this data is the HUGE discrepancy between the upstream and downstream data. While the authors say Netflix and BitTorrent dominate the traffic, it’s really only BitTorrent boosting up the upstream numbers (that is, the amount of data you send to the internet, as opposed to the amount you download from it). The gap is so huge, it seems that would present an easy way to target torrenters – simply by closely monitoring the upload rates, especially during the night.

Of course, even if something like that were instituted, torrenters wuold simply design a new technology to circumvent it. If there’s one thing this data proves, it’s that pirating and sharing isn’t going anywhere, despite the mutli-billion-dollar industry that’s engaged in a constant arms race with it’s own customers.

Streaming Bits: Apple Prepping Movie Cloud Service via @slashfilm

This week marked the launch of UltraViolet, a new digital locker system that would allow users to purchase content in one physical or digital format and access it across all platforms via a cloud-based system. The service came about through years of negotiation and collaboration between major studios, manufacturers, and retailers, but not everyone in the industry was on board — Apple and Disney were among the two biggest holdouts.

We’ve now learned why Apple declined to participate, and it’s pretty much the same reason Disney did. Apple has quietly been working on its own cloud service, expected to launch in late 2011 or early 2012, and has been working out deals with studios to allow videos purchased through iTunes to be streamed on any Apple device including iPhones, iPads, and Apple TV.

“Digital music locker”? Gosh, even themovie studios’ metaphors sound dated. A locker? Really? That particular metal device is pretty ill-suited to convey the freedom of syncing and listening to your music anywhere you go. A locker? That idea… just stinks.

Xbox Might Get Comcast and Verizon Cable Soon

Microsoft appears to be close to closing the deal on bringing Comcast and Verizon to the Xbox, with the console serving as a set-top box, according to Digiday.

If the reports are accurate, the deals could be done within the next 30 days. The deals would allow customers to subscribe to TV packages through Comcast or Verizon Fios directly through their consoles and avoid the dreaded dance with the cable guy.

Love it! Avoiding the $30 charge and 72-hour waiting period to get new cable installations done is simply l33t!

Rumor: Google Wants Hulu Really, Really Bad

All Things D’s Peter Kafka says that Google is willing to offer significantly more than what Amazon, Yahoo or Dish Network would be willing to offer in the bidding war for Hulu. But they also want more than what’s being offered.

I’m not sure I want the top two video distrubtion portals both run by Google. That sounds kinda scary. But is this what it will take to save Hulu?

YouTube embraces Google+ Hangouts for live streaming

YouTube is closely integrating Google’s Hangouts group video chat platform with its live streaming in an effort to make video watching more social. The site has already quietly begun to make live video feeds available to Hangouts users, and it will eventually add tools to improve discovery of live streams both within Hangouts and on YouTube.com, I was told by YouTube Live Product Manager Brandon Badger this week.

Hangouts has been joined at the hip with YouTube ever since the chat platform launched as part of Google+ at the end of June. Hangouts users can launch YouTube videos from within the group video chat, and up to ten participants can watch the same video simultaneously.

I’m really excited for this feature. I’m not sure exactly when live video chatting will take off for the mainstream, but sharing neat videos with friends, briefly, is definitely a best-use case scenario for the short term early adopters. When was the last time you made a FaceTime call? OK, when was the last time you shared a video with a friend? Mmhmm.

Fox Pulls Back Web Video, Encourages Piracy

It’s perfectly logical for the TV networks to try to lock up their shows online.

Except for the part about it not working.

On Aug. 15, Fox will stop distributing its shows on Hulu and Fox.com a day after they air, and will make most Web surfers wait eight days to see them. The only legal way around this, for now, is to pay for a subscription to either the Dish Network or Hulu Plus.

Steering your customers away from ad-laden content, to un-authorized streaming sites. News Corp is winning my “Archaic Stick-in-the-Mud Corporation Award” for the year.