Tag Archives: photos

Instagram says it now has the right to sell your photos

Under the new policy, Facebook claims the perpetual right to license all public Instagram photos to companies or any other organization, including for advertising purposes, which would effectively transform the Web site into the world’s largest stock photo agency. One irked Twitter user quipped that “Instagram is now the new iStockPhoto, except they won’t have to pay you anything to use your images.”

via news.cnet.com

Incredibly creepy policy shift from the recently-acquired Facebook subsidiary, Instagram.

Pinterest not a pirate anymore, helps site owners disable pins

The acts of “pinning” and “repinning” (re-sharing a pin created by another user) have come under fire, especially in photographer circles, as tools for copyright infringement. Members can easily grab copyrighted works from photo-sharing or media sites and clip them to their boards. Pinned images often include attribution, but sources later get lost in the shuffle, and some members go on to use images on their blogs or websites. Plus, considering that Google is the second most popular source of pins, a sizable percentage images are likely misattributed.

Now, Pinterest is providing website owners a simple snippet of code, located in the updated help section of the site, to help them nip unwanted sharing in the bud.

I think a much more robust solution would be to somehow hard-code the original links / attribution into the pins, so there’s no way to accidentally strip away the source through repinning. One of the most interesting things about Pinterest is its ability to ‘curate’ material in a way that never claims its your own, but also gives some credit to the organizer of a board for their taste. If this anti-pinning technique really takes off, a huge value of the site would be squashed.

Twitpic, Flickr And Other Photo-Sharing Sites Can Sell Your Images If They Want

Indignation spread through the Twittersphere when it was discovered that popular photo sharing service Twitpic was seemingly forbidding users from selling or distributing their own pictures. But Twitpic is not alone. Other photo services also exercise surprising controls over pictures uploaded by users, and most sites claim the right to use or distribute pictures without consent.

The Twitpic Terms of Service at that time (now changed) read:

You may not grant permission to photographic agencies, photographic libraries, media organizations, news organizations, entertainment organizations, media libraries, or media agencies to retrieve from Twitpic for distribution, license, or any other use, content you have uploaded to Twitpic.

After an uproar, Twitpic changed the conditions to clarify that users retain ownership of pictures they upload, but that Twitpic retains the right to use and distribute the content as the company sees fit.

The Terms of Service were updated thus:

You retain all ownership rights to Content uploaded to Twitpic. However, by submitting Content to Twitpic, you hereby grant Twitpic a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free, sublicenseable and transferable license to use, reproduce, distribute, prepare derivative works of, display, and perform the Content in connection with the Service and Twitpic’s (and its successors’ and affiliates’) business, including without limitation for promoting and redistributing part or all of the Service (and derivative works thereof) in any media formats and through any media channels.

This is why I don’t share photos on Facebook anymore. Looks like I’ll have to be even more careful around the services whose ethos I would assume prevent from these kind of underhanded manipulations, like Flickr.

Color’s Ambitious Photo App Seeks to Reinvent Mobile Social Networking

Say hello to Color, a new mobile photo-sharing application with a star-studded list of entrepreneurs and an eye-popping $41 million in funding. Its goal is nothing less than to become the ultimate local discovery tool.

The app, which made its debut just a few hours ago on iPhone (and very soon on Android), is best described as public photo and video-sharing app for groups. Yet it doesn’t have the typical friending or following that you’ll find on Facebook, Twitter, Path or Instagram. Instead, Color chooses which pictures you see based on your location and how often you’re sharing photos with someone else. Every photo and video is public, not only to the people you consider your friends, but to any stranger within your proximity.

Location-based mobile social sharing app with a specialized photography focus? How many buzzwords can you fit in a tagline?