Tag Archives: music

Digital Monopolies A Bigger Threat Than Piracy, Says Miramax CEO

Miramax CEO Mike Lang and Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos gave a keynote talk at the MIPCOM conference. The two discussed the challenges they face in the continuously changing digital world. Both agreed that piracy is not much of an issue as long as you give consumers what they want. Digital monopolies, such as Apple’s dominance in the music industry, are a far bigger threat.

It’s the classic power struggle between goliaths: they start to see their users as liabilities, and accordingly treat them with disrespect. Then another competitor comes along to gobble them up, in the opportunity void they created. Maybe the solution is to treat your customers like people, and cater to what they want?

Copyright Case Is Good News for Google, Amazon

The most important news is that a third federal court has ruled on behalf of Web services whose users might use it to upload and/or access files that violate copyright rules.

In this case, it’s MP3Tunes fending off EMI Music. But it’s the same basic story as the Veoh/Universal Music and YouTube/Viacom cases: A judge has ruled that the DMCA doesn’t require Web services to figure out which files that users upload have the right to be there.

Facebook To Launch Music Service With Spotify via @Forbes

Facebook has partnered with Spotify on a music-streaming service that could be launched in as little as two weeks, sources close to the deal have told Forbes.

The integrated service is currently going through testing, but when launched, Facebook users will see a Spotify icon appear on the left side of their newsfeed, along with the usual icons for photos and events.

Clicking on the Spotify icon will install the service on their desktop in the background, and also allow users to play from Spotify’s library of millions of songs through Facebook. The service will include a function that lets Facebook users listen to music simultaneously with their friends over the social network, one of the sources said.

Amazing that after all of Spotify’s positive press and US citizens clamoring to use the service, they still have to bootstrap themselves into business over here in the states using Facebook as a ladder. I don’t understand how this gets around the legal problems that prevented them from setting up shop here in the first place, but I guess Facebook is being recognized as the cash mule it is in media conglomerate circles. Maybe they just decided the money was too good.

Hopefully we’ll get to enjoy what the rest of the world has used to find new music for years, soon.

Apple Signing Deals For Cloud-Based Music Service

Yep. Apple is planning a cloud-based music locker service, which will let users stream their music, over the Web, to different devices.

Which may sound a lot like what Amazon rolled out last month.

From the music industry’s perspective, however, there’s a big difference: Amazon started its service without getting approval from the big music labels. But Apple is actively seeking licenses for its service, and will pay the labels for the privilege.

Except the lack of iOS support, Amazon’s cloud music service is everything I want. I’m fairly certain the Apple service, like Ping, will be primarily written to meet the company’s goals, not the users’.

Amazon Tells Labels Cloud Music Service Will Pay Off

It’s been two weeks since Amazon launched its cloud-based music service. And Amazon says it’s been a big success–for the music labels.

In a letter sent to the big labels, Amazon says it has been selling more MP3s since it launched the service. In other words: Stop whining about licensing deals and start thanking us for making you more money.

My first encounters with the service were definitely positive. But, where’s my iPhone version??

Amazon Cloud Player: First Impressions

Even from my short test, it became apparent that Amazon wasn’t launching some half-baked product; Cloud Player is a fully functional, very usable streaming music player that could even make iTunes obsolete for many people, and its ability to play on-device and cloud-based music could quickly make it Android’s killer app.

Amazon has thrown down the gauntlet and set a high bar for cloud-based music streaming. Apple and Google, which are expected to launch their own cloud players sometime this year, will have to match Amazon on usability and price if they’re going to compete.

Very exciting news. But where’s my iPhone app?!

Anyone know if it’s possible to use the in-phone browser to access the Amazon music cloud?

Update: Actually, Mashable says no.  But: How to Use Amazon Cloud Player with iOS Devices.