Tag Archives: content

Rumor: Google Wants Hulu Really, Really Bad

All Things D’s Peter Kafka says that Google is willing to offer significantly more than what Amazon, Yahoo or Dish Network would be willing to offer in the bidding war for Hulu. But they also want more than what’s being offered.

I’m not sure I want the top two video distrubtion portals both run by Google. That sounds kinda scary. But is this what it will take to save Hulu?

Fox’s 8-Day Delay on Hulu Triggers Piracy Surge

It’s been a week since Fox stopped offering free access to its TV-shows the day after they air on television. The TV-studio took this drastic step in the hope of getting more people to watch their shows live and thus make more revenue. TV-viewers, however, are outraged by the decision and have massively turned to pirated sources to watch their favorite shows.

foxOne of the main motivations for people to download and stream TV-shows from unauthorized sources is availability. If fans can’t get a show through legal channels they turn to pirated alternatives.

This is one of the reasons why Hulu drastically decreased TV-show piracy in the U.S. Viewers are happy with the legal streaming option it offers them, but not all studios see that as a success.

Starting last Monday, Fox began delaying the availability of new episodes on Hulu and Fox.com for 8 days. The decision goes directly against the wishes of the public but Fox will take this disappointment as collateral damage in the hope that the delay will result in more live viewers and better deals with cable and satellite distributors.

When the plan was first announced last month we predicted that it could lead to a significant boost in online piracy of Fox shows, and this does indeed turn out to be the case.

Paywall numbers for the NYT

The overall news from the New York Times Co.’s quarterly earnings report this week wasn’t good — net income is down 57 percent from a year ago — but there was one silver lining for online paid-content advocates: More than 100,000 people have begun paying for the Times’ website since it began charging for access last month.

100,000 doesn’t sound that high to me… and, 57% sounds pretty terrible also.

Google to Revamp YouTube With ‘Channels’ – WSJ.com

The site is planning a series of changes to its home page to highlight sets of “channels” around topics such as arts and sports. About 20 or so of those channels will feature several hours of professionally produced original programming a week, some of these people said. Additional channels would be assembled from content already on the site.

It is planning to spend as much as $100 million to commission low-cost content designed exclusively for the Web, people familiar with the matter said.

The pending changes are a big bet by the world’s most-popular video site to push in a new direction. Between the Wild West of user-generated content and the pricier precincts of full-blown TV shows, Google is hoping to carve out a niche of original, professionally produced Web videos that it hopes will cultivate loyal viewers.

Big, big news. With Netflix and Youtube both getting into the original content production game, new indie film students and fans everywhere should be rejoicing at this injection of capital into a talent-rich, but un-financed platform.

Help – Identi.ca

Identi.ca is a microblogging service. Users post short (140character) notices which are broadcast to their friends and fans usingthe Web, RSS, or instant messages.

If you’d like to try it out, first register a new account.Then, on the public timeline, enter your message intothe textbox at the top of the page, and click “Send”. It will go out on thepublic timeline and to anyone who is subscribed to your notices (probably nobody,at first).

Hey, there’s an even more open competitor to Twitter!

Netflix Original Content Is Much More Than A Strategy Shift — It Could Shift An Industry

But with House of Cards, the game changes. For the first time, they’re going to get people signing up to Netflix to get first access to content. And if it’s as good as the talent behind it suggests, they might get a lot of people signing up for that very reason.

And if that’s the case, they’ll be doing a lot more of these deals. And that would effectively make them a premium cable television channel — like HBO or Showtime. But they’ll be one with thousands more pieces of content for a lower monthly price. And they’ll be one not burdened by any artificial show times. Most importantly, they’ll be one not burdened by the cable television model — at all.

If Netflix’s new gamble here works, this is the absolutely the future. In three years, we won’t be paying $75 a month to a giant cable conglomerate. We’ll be paying $8 to Netflix and other players that pop up — like HBO (by themselves), perhaps. Sure, there will still be the monthly fee for Internet. But most of us are already paying that. We’d just be removing the ridiculous $75 cable television fee that gives us thousands of channels with content only on at a certain time — and most of which we don’t want.

I absolutely love the chaos the video distribution world is going through!

I Worked on the AOL Content Farm & It Changed My Life

AOL’s secret internal plan to ramp up its online content business was leaked today to New York business blog Business Insider and people are saying it’s got “content farm” written all over it. In-house writers are expected to write 5 to 10 blog posts per day and those stories are expected to go from an average of 1500 pageviews per post today to an amazing 7000 views per post in the future. How will stories be selected? The only thing that will matter, apparently, is search engine friendliness and monetization potential. That might sound terrible to outsiders, but having been there I want to say: Good luck AOL, I hope that strategy works wonderfully for you. I genuinely do.

I’m not sure why this surprises anyone. AOL was long ago bought out and gutted by ruthless corporate interests. SEO and low-hurdle content farm writing are the natural end-game moves of a struggling corporate behemoth that doesn’t really understand its market. The sad fact is there is a weird “beige market” created for this crap that no one wants, but still exists to farm mislabeled clicks and deceptive titles into pennies per transaction – yet pennies which, in scale, make billions.