Stealth marketing: Microsoft paying YouTubers for Xbox One mentions | Ars Technica

This weekend, word started leaking of a new promotion offering Machinima video partners an additional $3 CPM i.e., $3 per thousand video views for posting videos featuring Xbox One content. The promotion was advertised by Machinima’s UK community manager in a since-deleted tweet, and it also appears on Machinima’s activity feed on Poptent, a clearinghouse for these kind of video marketing campaigns. The Poptent page also mentions an earlier campaign surrounding the Xbox One’s launch in November, which offered an additional $1 CPM for videos “promoting the Xbox One and its release games.”

According to a leaked copy of the full legal agreement behind the promotion, video creators “may not say anything negative or disparaging about Machinima, Xbox One, or any of its Games” and must keep the details of the promotional agreement confidential in order to qualify for payment. In other words, to get the money, video makers have to speak positively or at least neutrally about the Xbox One, and they can’t say they’re being paid to do so.

via Stealth marketing: Microsoft paying YouTubers for Xbox One mentions | Ars Technica.

Net neutrality is half-dead: Court strikes down FCC’s anti-blocking rules | Ars Technica

The Federal Communication Commission’s net neutrality rules were partially struck down today by the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, which said the Commission did not properly justify its anti-discrimination and anti-blocking rules.

Those rules in the Open Internet Order, adopted in 2010, forbid ISPs from blocking services or charging content providers for access to the network. Verizon challenged the entire order and got a big victory in today’s ruling. While it could still be appealed to the Supreme Court, the order today would allow pay-for-prioritization deals that could let Verizon or other ISPs charge companies like Netflix for a faster path to consumers.

The NSA Spies On America’s Favorite Device—Time To Get Angry – ReadWrite

Security researcher Jacob Applebaum gave a talk at the 30th Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg, Germany yesterday outlining how the NSA has had the capability to break into an iPhone and siphon off of all the communications and activity on the device since 2008. German publication Der Spiegel also has its own extensive report showing that the NSA has a program called DROPOUTJEEP that is the codename of the iPhone hack.

In addition to the iPhone hack, the NSA has a unit called TAO—Tailored Access Operations—that has the primary duty of intercepting and bugging hardware phones, laptops, servers that various reports have stated HP and Cisco servers. Basically, the NSA can get at whatever it wants just about anywhere it wants. Der Spiegel also reports that the NSA has successfully tapped undersea fiber optics cables running from Europe, through the Middle East to Asia.

via The NSA Spies On America’s Favorite Device—Time To Get Angry – ReadWrite.